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“Every Child Has a Name” At The Dallas Holocaust Museum

The Dallas Holocaust Museum- Center For Education and Tolerance is currently hosting an exhibit entitled “Every Child Has a Name”.  This heart wrenching exhibit focuses on the remembrance of the 1.5 million Jewish children who were murdered during the terror of the Nazi regime between 1933 and 1945.
The exhibit is comprised of three different sections.  The first section focuses on children’s drawings and poems in the Terezin ghetto.  Between 1942-1944 thousands passed through the ghetto which was both a stop before transportation to Auschwitz and a staging ground for Nazi propaganda.  Here organization leaders would check in on the treatment of prisoners.  An artist, Friedl- Dicker Brandeis, who had been transported to Terezin, taught drawing at a school created by the adults there to help minimize the suffering for the children.  Before being transported to Auschwitz, Dicker- Brandeis hid two suitcases full of the drawings of children.  Although reproductions of these drawings have been viewed extensively around the world, this is the first time they have been displayed in Dallas.
The second section of the exhibit is comprised of a selection from a travelling exhibit from Yad Vashem which is Israel’s living memorial to those lost in the Holocaust and is located in Jerusalem.  The selection is poignantly named, “No Child’s Play” and explores how Jewish children played before and during the Holocaust.
The third part of the exhibit is a sculpture created by a local artist.  It is made out of 300,000 pennies that were collected by Dallas school children in an effort to visually demonstrate the severity of the loss of the lives of children in the Holocaust.
Sure to be an extremely touching exhibit, “Every Child Has a Name” will be at the Dallas Holocaust Museum until March 18th 2012.


  1. There’s always hope in every child. The art of persuasion “how to dream” leaves a wide space in their hearts and mind. Just knowing about the Halocaust is critical in a child’s creativity. It’s an inspiration…I enjoy these kinds of art museums! thank you for posting!

    • Kate Koop says:

      I agree that as hard as it is, it’s important to teach children about the Holocaust. I plan on taking my children to this exhibit. Thank you very much for your kind words and for stopping by.

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